2010: Books Read

Here’s a list of the books or shorter works that I’ve read in full this year. Inevitably I forget to list a lot of the shorter nonfiction I read, PDFs and whatnot, and tend not to list poetry unless I’ve been, rarely, compelled to read a collection from cover to cover. A longer list could be compiled of the books I abandon, either in the first few pages if it is not remotely to my taste, or more often after 40-50 pages when I’ve at least given it a good shot. I also have a shelf of books that I reread frequently, just a page or two, call them comfort reading.

[* Reread]
[^ Short Story or Short Non-Fiction]

*Julian Barnes – The Lemon Table
Virginia Woolf – Mrs. Dalloway
Michael Cunningham – The Hours
Virginia Woolf – A Writer’s Diary
Moyra Davey – The Problem of Reading
Virginia Woolf – To the Lighthouse
Lewis Buzbee – The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop
J. M. Coetzee – Boyhood: Scenes From a Provincial Life
J. M. Coetzee - Youth: Scenes From a Provincial Life II
J. M. Coetzee – Summertime
Aldo Buzzi – A Weakness for Almost Everything
Patrick Leigh Fermor – A Time to Keep Silence
Michael Dirda – Readings
Cyril Connolly – The Unquiet Grave – A Word Cycle by Palinurus
Yiyun Li – The Vagrants
Virginia Woolf – The Waves
Rick Gekoski – Tolkien’s Gown
Alberto Manguel – A Reader on Reading
Anne Michaels - Fugitive Pieces
David Shields – Reality Hunger: A Manifesto
Zadie Smith – Changing My Mind
Franz Kafka – Letter to my Father (trans. Howard Colyer)
Louis Begley – Kafka: The Tremendous World I Have Inside My Head
Franz Kafka – The Trial
David Shields -The Thing About Life is That One Day You’ll Be Dead
Adam Thirlwell – Politics
David Foster Wallace – This is Water
Tom McCarthy – Remainder
Penelope Fitzgerald – The Blue Flower
John Williams – Stoner
Michael Alexander (trans.) – The First Poems in English
Albert C. Baugh and Thomas Cable – A History of the English Language (sections I, II, III)
Robert D. Richardson – First We Read, Then we Write: Emerson on the Creative Process
Seamus Heaney – Beowulf
^Jorge Luis Borges – ‘Death and the Compass,’ *’The South,’ ‘The Dead Man,’ *’Funes, The Memorious’
Aristotle – Poetics
Philip Larkin – Collected Poems
^Umberto Eco – ‘The Poetics and Us,’ ‘Borges and My Anxiety of Influence.’
Edith Grossman – Why Translation Matters
Cervantes – Don Quixote (trans. Edith Grossman)
^*Jorge Luis Borges – The Library of Babel
Stevie Smith – Selected Poems
Leonard Woolf – Growing: an Autobiography of the Years 1904 to 1911
Vladimir Nabokov – Despair
David Pierce – Reading Joyce
*James Joyce – A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
James Joyce – Ulysses
Declan Kiberd – Ulysses and Us: The Art of Everyday Living
Jean-Patrick Manchette – Three to Kill
Honoré de Balzac – Treatise on Elegant Living
Sarah Hall – How to Paint a Dead Man
James Joyce – Dubliners
Louis Begley - Why the Dreyfus Affair Matters
Gabriel Josipovici – The Singer on the Shore
Gabriel Josipovici – What Ever Happened to Modernism?
Virginia Woolf – The Common Reader Vol.1
*Franz Kafka – Dearest Father (trans. Hannah and Richard Stokes)
^Maurice Blanchot – Orpheus’ Gaze
Gabriel Josipovici – The Lessons of Modernism
Gabriel Josipovici – Touch
Dag Solstad – Shyness and Dignity
Dag Solstad – Novel 11, Book 18
Gabriel Josipovici – Writing and the Body
^Edgar Allan Poe – The Pit and the Pendulum
*Franz Kafka - The Castle
Simon Critchley – Continental Philosophy – A Very Short Introduction
Andrei Codrescu – The Poetry Lesson
Saul Bellow – Dangling Man
*Gustave Flaubert – Madame Bovary (trans. Lydia Davis)
Hugh Kenner – Flaubert, Joyce and Beckett: The Stoic Comedians
Naomi Klein - The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism
Saul Bellow – The Victim
Marguerite Duras – The Malady of Death
Ričardas Gavelis – Vilnius Poker
Max Brod – Franz Kafka: A Biography

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