Tag Archives: Simon Critchley

Some Well-Intentioned Reading Ideas for 2015 (updated)

These are not reading resolutions. Writers promising literary gifts lead me astray too easily for these ideas to be fixed in any way. This year I read widely covering fifty or so writers, concentrating my reading more deeply only twice on … Continue reading

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The Highest Laugh

Laughter evolved not for its health benefits but because of its impact on others, and therefore positive benefits should most reliably occur within interpersonal contexts. Evolutionary accounts of laughter exists because of the generally accepted view that laughter is a … Continue reading

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Book List

In no particular order, this is a list of my favourite writers/books. Of course, it is incomplete. Vladimir Nabokov’s Ada or Ardor: A Family Chronicle, Pale Fire and Speak, Memory and literary lectures Franz Kafka Geoff Dyer JG Ballard Simone … Continue reading

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The Problem of Motivational Force

The mistake of most moralists has always been to consider man as an essentially reasonable being. Man is a sensitive being, who consults solely his passions in order to act, and for whom reason serves only to palliate the follies … Continue reading

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How do we speak of God-without religion

“We are moving toward a completely religionless time,” where even those who honestly describe themselves as religious “do not in the least act up to it.” Dietrich Bonhoeffer, in a letter to Eberhard Bethge [via Simon Critchley’s The Faith of … Continue reading

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Simon Critchley’s Impossible Objects

As I wrote in my last post, Simon Critchley is a philosopher eager to communicate his ideas to people outside the academy. He considers philosophy ‘a way of relearning to look at the world’. I read Critchley’s books because they … Continue reading

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The Education of Grown-ups

Impossible Objects is a collection of interviews with philosopher Simon Critchley, whose work has appealed to me for several years. His approach to philosophy is pragmatic and mostly comprehensible to those outside the academy. In the interview entitled Keep Your … Continue reading

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Malone Dies by Beckett

In Malone Dies Beckett distorts fiction beyond the boundaries of Molloy. There is less humour to take the edge off that pervasive darkness. Or there is more humour but the gloom is more overwhelmingly. Once again, the impeccably constructed, pared-back … Continue reading

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Autumn Books

It is my favourite time of the year for book buying, when publishers release the highest volume of compelling books. Most of the books I buy during the year are older releases, filling gaps in my collection of the thirty … Continue reading

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Molloy by Beckett

A significant departure from earlier Beckett’s stories, Molloy resists summary. It is a strange loop of a novel that winds up where it started out. A dying narrator writes words onto paper, pages that are paid for and collected each week. … Continue reading

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