The Latent Possibility of Pure Language

In The Order of Things, Michel Foucault suggests that around the time of what is now known as the Enlightenment, a great divide, illusory maybe but no less powerful for that, took place. In Western culture before that age there was a ‘reciprocal kinship between knowledge and language. The nineteenth century was to dissolve that link, and leave behind it, in confrontation, a knowledge closed in upon itself and a pure language that had become, in nature and function, enigmatic — something that has been called since that time, Literature.’

It isn’t easy or even possible to project back to a time when readers thought Job or Achilles existed, when foundation stories were read as faithful renditions of events or people. This was the emergence of fiction, when literature was set a higher task. At the moment when literature became disassociated from reality, it became essential, a way through another consciousness to glimpse a possibility of truth. This project was in a way always doomed, a failure to translate the untranslatable, but it is the latent and revelatory nature of the search that is the measure of accomplishment.

This failure is constantly visible in the act of translation, whose task is to unearth the buried fragments of pure language. Walter Benjamin wrote, ‘It is the task of the translator to release in his own language that pure language which is under the spell of another, to liberate the language imprisoned in a work in his recreation of that work. For the sake of pure language, he breaks through decayed barriers of his own language.”

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Anthony

Time's Flow Stemmed is a notebook of my wild readings.

2 thoughts on “The Latent Possibility of Pure Language

  1. Before embarking on the projection of “a time when readers thought Job or Achilles existed, when foundation stories were read as faithful renditions of events or people,” do read Marcel Detienne’s L’invention de la mythologie (The Creation of Mythologie, translated by Margaret Cook), which posits a much earlier split between mythos and logos.

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    1. Thanks, I’ve read references to his work through other writers. Detienne, I think, suggests the ‘true’ creation of literature, in this sense, came with Thucydides, Pindar and Herodotus. It looks like a book worth reading. Thank you.

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